What is SMTP Authentication and How do I enable it?

SMTP Authentication

SMTP Authentication

It is the mechanism by which the clients of an ISP identify themselves to the mail server through which they intend to send email. It is not possible for any person to send email via any mail server they choose, mail servers will only allow the sending of email by legitimate users.

 

How it works:

Upon sending an email, the user’s mail client (Outlook, Thunderbird, etc) will identify itself to the mail server by supplying the username and associated password of the email account. Should these credentials be valid, the user’s mail is accepted and will be processed and relayed to its recipient destination. If the authentication fails, an appropriate error message is generated by the user’s mail client.

In most cases, you can send without authentication to local e-mail addresses of this domain (i.e. send from user@domain.com to user1@domain.com), because the server does not need to relay your e-mail to external servers. Authentication is required whenever the recipient is not of a local domain (i.e. send from user@example.com to user1@example1.com, provided that example.com and example1.com use different e-mail servers).

Every rule has its exceptions. Some servers require the client to authenticate itself even when sending to a local domain. But more popular case is opposite – some servers do not support authentication but allow the client to send with no limitations (so called open relays). To avoid exploiting such server by spammers, it usually restricts the IP address list of allowed sender. Typical case if when your application resides on such server and the server allows unauthenticated servers to relay e-mail only if they connect from the server computer itself.

 

Please follow the relevant instructions below to verify SMTP Authentication is enabled.

 

Outlook Express

1) From the Tools menu, choose “Accounts.”
2) Select the “Mail” tab.
3) Double-click the email account you need to update. (i.e. mail.yourdomain.com).
4) Select the “Servers” tab.
5) Check the box next to “My Server Requires Authentication.”
6) Click “Ok”.

Outlook 98 and 2000

1) From the Tools menu, choose “Accounts.”
2) Select email account you need to update. (i.e. mail.yourdomain.com).
3) Click “Properties”.
4) Select the “Servers” tab.
5) Check the box next to “My Server Requires Authentication.”
6) Click “Ok”.

Outlook 2002 and 2003

1) From the Tools menu, select “Email Accounts.”
2) Select “View or change existing email accounts” and click “Next.”
3) Select your Email account and click the “Change” button on the right.
4) Click the “More Settings” button in the bottom-right corner of the E-Mail Accounts window.
5) In the Internet Email Settings window, click the “Outgoing Server” tab.
6) Check the box next to “My outgoing server (SMTP) requires authentication.”

Outlook 2007

1) From the Tools menu, select “Account Settings.”
2) Select your Email account and click the “Change” button.
3) Click the “More Settings” button in the bottom-right corner of the E-Mail Accounts window.
4) In the Internet Email Settings window, click the “Outgoing Server” tab.
5) Check that the box next to “My outgoing server (SMTP) requires authentication” is checked and “use same settings as my incoming mail server” is selected.

Outlook 2010

1) From the File menu, select “Info” and choose “Account Settings.”
2) Select your Email account and click the “Change” button.
3) Click the “More Settings…” button in the bottom-right corner of the E-Mail Accounts window.
4) In the Internet Email Settings window, click the “Outgoing Server” tab.
5) Check that the box next to “My outgoing server (SMTP) requires authentication” is checked and “use same settings as my incoming mail server” is selected.

Thunderbird

1) Open Thunderbird and from the top menu select Tools > Account Settings…
2) At the bottom of the list click on ‘Outgoing Server (SMTP)’, and then click once on the appropriate email account from the list and click Edit.
3) The SMTP server settings will appear. There will be an dropdown menu for Authentication Method with five options in it. If the option ‘No Authentication’ is selected then change it to ‘Password, transmitted insecurely’ and this will enable SMTP Authentication.
4) Make sure the User Name box contains your FULL email address. Unlike other email programs, Thunderbird doesn’t ask for your password at this stage, but it will ask the first time you try to send an outgoing email.
5) Save and close the settings by clicking OK. All done!

Apple Mail

1) Open Apple Mail and in the top menubar click on Mail > Preferences > Accounts.
2) Click once on the appropriate email account from the list and click Account Information. Click on the “Outgoing Mail Server (SMTP)” pulldown list and select “Edit SMTP Server List…” from the bottom of the list.
3) Click on Advanced and make sure Authentication is set to ‘Password’. This will enabled SMTP Authentication.
4) Make sure the User Name box contains your FULL email address and make sure your Password is correct (as specified in your control panel).
5) Save and close the advanced settings by clicking OK, then close the Preferences window by clicking on the X in the upper left hand corner of the window. All done!

Apple iPhone or iPad

1) Tap on ‘Settings’ from your main screen
2) Tap ‘Mail, Contacts, Calendar’ button
3) Tap on YOUR EMAIL ACCOUNT
4) Scroll down to the ‘Outgoing Mail Server’
5) Make sure the User Name box contains your FULL email address and make sure your Password is correct (as specified in your control panel).
6) Make sure Authentication is set to ‘Password’. This will enabled SMTP Authentication.
7) Save and close the settings. All done!

 

Thank you.!!!

My name is Shashank Shekhar. I am a Software Engineer, currently working in one of the leading web-hosting companies in India. I am having 2 years of experience in Linux Server Administration.

I love to work in Linux environment & love learning new things.

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